Self-development

Bismillah,

 

The girls have been going to swimming for the past two weeks. Alhamdulillah, Big S is swimming so well without armbands. I actually doubted her swimming skills since we have not been at all for the past 6 months (since the birth of baby S, that is nearly half a year subhanAllah). And even before that we were not going regularly due to pregnancy and other issue. Hence I was actually very surprised when I saw her swimming. Especially the second week, she was swimming on her back, on her front, with her head under the water and she tried sideways. So, she was basically confident enough to try out different styles of swimming.

Now middle S is a complete different story. First week we didn’t take armbands so she was constantly either clinging to me or to metal bar on the side of the pool. Second week, with armbands on, she did let the metal bar go a little and she was praising herself so much for that. This girl of mine does not like to challenge herself. SubhanAllah.

Anyway, this post is supposed to be about myself and how I am connecting to the children. Since I have come back from Saudi, I keep thinking and rethinking about our set ways of doing things and my teaching and I feel there is something missing. I am often disappointed with myself. Generally speaking, I think one feels quite disappointed to return to this “dunya” where everything revolves around worldly things and you have just been to a holy a place at a time everything revolves around Godly things. Very strange feeling.

So, I keep evaluating things at home and keep asking “What do I want to achieve out of this homeschool thing? What is it really I am striving for?” Yes I want them to be able to read and understand Qur’an. Yes I want them to learn the Arabic language proficiently. Yes I want them to excel in Math, English, Science and in all their academic subjects. Yes I want them to go to top universities and become a dentist, a doctor, an archaeologist and ocean explorer, a story writer and an illustrator. However, the bottom line is, I want them to be good MUSLIMS.  So, before anything else, I want them to have good spiritual connection with Allah the Almighty and submit completely to the will of God. I want them to have that complete tavakkul (faith) and certainty with Allah swt and live their lives according to Islam.

I think we all agree that there is really only one effective way of moulding their character in this way from young age. There is only one thing we can do and that is SELF-DEVELOPMENT. If I really want to instil Islamic values in my children so they build up an Islamic character, the way forward is to start focusing more on myself. Because children will naturally observe, imitate, copy the adults of the household. And I strongly feel that my children are educating me in so many ways. They make me so conscious of what I say, how I speak, what’s my attitude and how I react. I know they are banking all these somewhere in their brain and will have exact same attitude to most things in life later on. That is so scary for me because I know I have a lot of character traits to improve. I am constantly praying that my children will turn up as someone much better than myself. Inshalla they won’t pick up those bad characteristics. Then at night time I lay in bed thinking “You are kidding yourself. The only way forward is to change those bad bits into good bits”. That is such a struggle, to constantly battle with your own self. May Allah guide and help us all.

So I am disappointed every time I shout to discipline them. I want them to have the love of Allah, the love of the prophet saw and the love of deen. But, I am so quick to point out their mistakes and shortcomings. I am so quick to judge and preach them. I lecture them daily about how Muslims should do things in Islam. And I fear that I am doing “more correcting and less connecting”. I am not really connecting to them in a manner that brings the love of learning Islam, the love of seeking knowledge into their lives. Sometimes I hear a friend or a colleague saying “Oh I hated Maths at school” or “I remember hating this or that subject so much” and the worst thing to happen would be one of our children saying “Oh I hated doing Arabic” or “I hated reading Qur’an” or have very negative attitude towards seeking Shari’ah knowledge.

So, I have decided to focus on 3 things for myself and for my family: Love everyone for the sake of Allah (because this stops that judgemental attitude you have towards others, including one’s children), Live in the moment (focus at present, plan as if you have forever but live as if you only have today) and Share the khayr.  When it comes to children, here is my target to do lise

  • Shout less
  • Discipline less- what it really means is criticise less. praise vs criticism ratio should be 5:1
  • Fill them up with love and make them feel loved unconditionally, regardless of what they do, what they say
  • Create such an atmosphere at home where everyone feels appreciated, wanted, valued
  • Listen to them when they speak, get to their level, make eye-contact
  • Say “yes” more often then “no”
  • More connecting through fun family activities

 

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Back to home-school 2013

Bismillah,

This is my very late post on our back-to-school life.

The thing is, I have not been able to do much planning for this academic year. With the birth of a baby in the summer holidays; followed by Ramadan (I was fasting as well as fully breastfeeding the baby); followed by me going back to work; followed by preparations for Hajj (inshaAllah we are off to Hajj in 2 weeks) there just seems to be not enough time to plan and teach everything I want to. So the bad news is that we are not as organized for this year. However, the good news is that I am totally loving it! LOL

We tend to go more towards unschooling approach, taking each day at a time, trying to follow the flow of life, let the kids dictate what they want to do each day and follow their lead. The number of articles I have been reading and the past few months experience teaching and working with parents have somewhat made me more relaxed towards my children’s daily routine. The fact that big S is still not yet fully 7 contributes to this fact of me “chilling out”and “taking things easy”. I keep telling myself that we will start our more regimented/schedule based lessons when they are older. I will be spending more time “teaching on the table” at least after a child turns 7. Of course, I am still teaching all day long on the go, very informal kind of teaching where I have to answer their 101 questions on various topics. Sometimes I just say to them “Go and do your own research on google” lol. And they just love it since they get to use the laptop.

Anyway, we plan and Allah plans and in the end He knows best. Here is what I have planned and what they have been doing this school year so far.

English– Big S is always reading. We are all concerned that she is reading too much and missing on some life-skills she could be learning. Sometimes she spends 6-7 hours in her room reading whereas her little sister spends just as much time helping me around the house by tidying up, polishing, arranging the books neatly on shelves, arranging everything in cupboards around the kitchen, peeling and washing the vegetables I need for today’s cooking etc.

I am trying to get Sumayya to narrate more and Alhamdulillah she is just coming out of her shell. She still does not acquire the skills to narrate the stories she has read in nice chronological order of events, using rich vocabulary to get consistent, smooth flow of events happened in the story. But at this point I am happy with what she can do in narration.

Her composition skills are just coming along and we still practise story-writing. I give a topic to write a story or the first 1-2 sentences and ask her to finish off the story. She writes short stories quite comfortably. I correct her spelling and grammar mistakes. It always strucks me how little grammar or spelling mistakes she makes, even though I have never taught her any grammar and we have never followed any spelling programmes. Alhamdulillah, the magic of reading a lot!

Safiyya can now read short story books. But, the truth is she does not enjoy reading. It is a struggle for her to finish even one book from beginning till end. I remember at her age Sumayya would read as many as 10 such books a day. But then again, Safiyya has excellent narration skills. She mostly analyses the illustrations and comes up with her own story. And she tells me any story so nicely. Her imagination is just awesome and she is way too creative for her age. Alhamdulillah.

We wont do any official writing with her but she is always writing me letters, making cards with messages inside, drawing pictures and writing captions etc. Again, I am happy with her literacy skills at this point.

Ibrahim has been going to Raising Explorers with us since August. Alhamdulillah, he is very social even though he has very limited vocab in English language. He communicates mainly in Uzbek and still learning English. We will start the phonics when I think he is ready. He tries to write when his sisters are writing and has good hand-eye coordination.

Maths- Big S finished MEPs Year 1 and we have mainly been revising the topics. I have to say that this is very challenging Maths programme for both of us. I have tried to teach some of the things inside to other kids at work and most of them were blown away. I have reviewed some other Maths programmes recently, namely Singapore Maths, Kumon Maths and in the end decided to stick to MEPs for a number of reasons (explaining them would require another post). So, inshaAllah we shall proceed onto MEPs YEAR 2 with big S next week.

Little S did MEPs Year 1 up to number rounds up to 10. She is very good in Maths. Indeed kids come with different packages of skills. Sumayya is good at English/literacy and a bit weaker in Maths. Safiyya is weak in English but good at Maths. So, alhamdulillah she will continue with MEPs Year 1 (although she is officially reception kid in the UK for this academic year)

We have just started learning shapes, colours, numbers 0-10 with Ibrahim. We use shape sorters, coloured foam and wooden building blocks, flashcards, coloured stacking cups to learn those. (He is now 2 btw)

Science- nothing formal, no workbooks, no special programmes, except watching and observing things/movements around us and learning about them.

Qur’an– my aim for this Year for big S is start reading the Qur’an cover-to-cover from back to front inshaAllah. We still mainly focus on hifdh and I ask her to read a random page or  a random surah here and there. She can read alhamdulillah. Still using Madinah Arabic Book 1 in Arabic.

Little S is still on hifdh. She has a long way to finish Juzz Amma inshaAllah. She can read a stand alone words from various surahs but can not read on mus’haf as reading is not her thing. Still using Gateway to Arabic Book 1 in Arabic.

Islamic Studies- again very much hands-on approach. We talk, discuss, explain all Islamic concepts, rituals, practices all day long; we try to pray together; we try to read Qur’an daily; we try to say all our daily duas; make dhikr and dua etc. We read books and stories. They both won an Islamic activity book each at Raising Explorers Eid party recently and have been trying to complete them.

Sumayya was awarded as one of the best achieving students in her class. She is half way through this book

Safiyya won this book in the Qur’an competition for her age group

InshaAllah, Sumayya will start attending Maths/English/Science classes at Raising Explorers from next Saturday. She will be attending an hour of each class on Saturdays only, a total of 3 hours, Safiyya is too young to attend those classes yet. We will carry on at home.

My rough scheduling is that I am aiming to have at least 4 hours of Maths a week with each child, 4 hours of Qur’an, 3 hours of English inshaAllah.

Baking fun

Bismillah,

There is nothing that children value more than human experience. They have always got this craving for an adult attention. They all want to be heard, to be answered, to be praised.  My experience working with children taught me this. They love talking to and spending time with adults.

Alhamdulillah one of the things I have been doing a lot and really enjoying is baking fun with my kids. Since grandma stopped eating the toast bread, we started making Uzbek naan bread at home. Something that we do weekly. And since I am baking an Uzbek bread, I always add something special on the side for kids be it pizzas or biscuits or a cupcake etc. So, below are some of the things the girls have been baking.

I got big S a set of cookie cutters as part of her Eid gifts. She had been asking me when she could use those. Finally, last week we baked some cookies where all 3 enjoyed rolling the dough and cutting out their cookies. And more fun followed where they put the icing and sprinkles!!!

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All my children love pizza. We bake pizza at least once a week. We only do 2 flavours as they are not keen on various different types of veg being put on top. We do tune+sweetcorn and keema with plenty of cheese each. We all love cheese, yum.

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Cupcakes

May Allah enable us to continue on this baking journey. And it works as a great treat to reward their good behaviour.

From 3 to 4…

Bismillah,

Very late Ramadan Mubarak to all!!! May Allah bless us with good deeds and enable us to rip the rewards of the last ten days, amin.

I don’t know where to start and what to write. SubhanAllah, I have been super busy with the arrival of baby Saida. Allah has blessed us with a baby girl on 13 June 2013. Alhamdulillah, she is healthy and growing well. As you can guess from the title of this post, there is a massive difference from being a mother of 3 to a mother of 4. I am so tired and exhausted these days. Each wants attention, each wants one-one time, each wants a bit of love and hug and each needs disciplining. I am so tired of being the judge between the elder 3. They are always fighting for the same book, pen, pencils or crayons or something else. I am often stuck trying to think how to deal with sibling fighting and sibling jealousy between them, or trying to think of ways diverting one of their attention to something else. I think any mother learns how to be a super clever with 4 young children under her arms.  And I am no exception, slowly but surely adjusting to be a mother “with- multiple- children- born- within- short- age gap”. Ya Allah, please make me among the patient…

Home-ed has pretty much stopped well before the arrival of the baby. The main reason was the warm weather we had over the past 2 months. Kids have been literally spending all day outdoors playing. They are out in the garden from 8am till 8pm. Both of our neighbours’ daughters come out and they have spent a lot of time with them. They often go barefoot in the garden, love playing with sand and mud, like digging, running, jumping, throwing, collecting sticks and leaves, making stuff out of everything and anything they could find out in the garden.

They collected lots of different flower petals and sealed in a jar with some water to make a perfume the other day. Sumayya likes to make things using leaves. Alhamdulillah, they are so good at keeping themselves busy. If I give them a bit of resources and instruction, theyspend some time being creative. They make things out of any packaging or paper/newspaper we have at hand.  Because I have not had a time to plan and organize more structured learning sessions, they have had a lot of creative play time. MashaAllah, they learn better when they take the lead through their own ideas and plans (but also fight a lot when left unsupervised, one wants to stick it here and another wants to stick a there and third thinks sticking is not a good idea)

I just have to be a bit more patient and to do a bit less shouting. I just have to do a bit more connecting and a bit less correcting. I keep trying to remember my own childhood, how I grew up and how I behaved etc. I can only remember the flashbacks of happy moments. I want them to have a memory of happy childhood. I keep making dua asking Allah to give me the ability to deal with their arguments and fights in a more calmly manner. I often think I might break their confidence with my “no-stop-pointing-out-only-the-negatives”. It is true though, we don’t notice quick enough to comment when children are so nice, behave and play well together. But, as soon as something goes wrong, we jump with criticism. I have read a lot of posts by Hands Free Revolution in my search of guilt-free parenting. MashaAllah, she writes very useful stuff

Anyway, here is the photo reportage of how they have been spending the summer.

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Sumayya cutting pictures out of newspaper for her story

Safiyya is making flashcards for herself

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Sumayya building a masjid with a friend

We took them to have a paddle and swim in the big fountains at the city park daily when the weather was nice.

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Ibrahim at the city park

Ibrahim loves playing football in the water

We take them to Lister park 2-3 times a week where they can discover the nature in botanical gardens, play in the playground and go visit the gallery inside the Cartwright hall.  Sumayya often rides her bike and Safiyya rides a scooter. We need to get her a new bike soon (Alhamdulillah, we are lucky to live so close to this park)

Safiyya and Ibrahim outside the Cartwright gallery

I have resumed the Qur’an hifdh sessions again at the start of Ramadan after we had had another 2-3 weeks break. It is just so difficult to restart once we stop. Sumayya had a lot of meltdowns and did not want to memorize or revise any surahs she has memorized before. As soon as I call her for Qur’an, she starts feeling “not so well”. I remind them both of the benefits of reading and learning the book of Allah, give them treats for doing well. But, subhanAllah, can not think of how I can make it more enjoyable for them.  One day when I asked Sumayya to revise some surahs, she started reciting unwillingly and she started crying. I was so angry and upset so I asked, “Why are you crying? As soon as it is Qur’an time, either you are tired, either you are hungry, either you have headache. How do you want to enter Jannah if you don’t want to learn Qur’an. Even if you don’t want to, you have to force yourself. It will be difficult at first, but then Allah will make it easy and enjoyable for you. You have to keep trying.” At that she was crying even more because she knows I am right. When she knows she is in the wrong she feels sorry for herself and cries even more. I wanted to tell her off but I calmed down myself. So I asked again “Why are you crying, just tell me?” and she goes “Because I have to cry when I make dhikr of Allah”. I burst out laughing. She quickly thought of a healthy alternative to why she cries when she reads the Qur’an. Anyway, 20 days of Ramadan already behind, and we have just re-established our daily Qur’an hifdh sessions in the mornings. May Allah make it continuous, amin.

After they finish hifdh, I ask Sumayya to read 1 surah from 29th juzz. MashaAllah, she can now read the Qur’an, though she finds it a bit difficult and challenging at times. I think she enjoys reading more than memorizing. Then we read either from the English or the Uzbek translation of meanings of some of the surahs they have memorized.

One day we read the tafsir of Surah Burooj. They were so impressed with the story of “The owners of the pit”. Then we all watched the Boy and the King and loved it. We had long and fruitful discussion afterwards. You can watch it here with your kids when you have a spare time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0hJU4rvKqw

We have not been able to do anything specific on Ramadan other than following their Ramadan calendar. I had 4 Ramadan calendars from Islamic Relief’s Hilal kids’ club. I don’t know where I got them initially but I have had them for the past couple of years and waiting for the girls to grow a bit older to use them. They all came in Ramadan pack with a calendar, “I am fasting” stickers, penny-box and some activity sheets. They both made the penny-box using the materials provided and have decorated a sadaqah jar each as well. Every day after the Qur’an session I give them some pennies or any other changes I could find in my purse. That is their treat for learning Qur’an during Ramadan. They are so eager to calculate how much they could collect till the end of Ramadan. They want to donate it to the needy in Uzbekistan inshaAllah.

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Ramadan calendar with flips for each day of Ramadan

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They can read and follow up a good deed for that particular day under each flip

Sumayya can easily fast till 6-7pm in the evening. Safiyya fasts till lunch lol. She eats so often and so much (or so it seems to me). Ibrahim just knows we are fasting and therefore can not eat.

I ask Allah swt to grant us all mothers a beautiful patience, bless us all with pious children who could serve as means of purification and entering Jannah for us all amin. May Allah make us content with what we have and make parenting easy and enjoyable for all. Please keep me and our family in your duas inshaAllah.

Play

Bismillah,

Enjoying a quiet afternoon all by myself I thought I might as well post. Alhamdulillah, it has been nice outside today. Husband took big S and little I swimming. Little S has not been feeling well the past 2-3 days with on-off temperature and cough. So she had to stay behind. After a little bit of cry she quickly fell asleep on the sofa.

We have generally enjoyed quite a few sunny days over the past two weeks. As such, children have been spending a great deal of time outside, playing, planting, digging, cycling, watering flowers, collecting bugs and getting up to all sort of messy things.

One big news since I last posted is that big S has taught herself how to cycle on big bicycle. She had really old bike which her dad got her in car boot last year. She was riding it so much and poor thing broke. We got her a new bike 2 weeks ago. MashaAllah, we have been going to Lister park 2-3 times a week to cycle. Usually kids cycle and I just go for long walks. Now it is time we buy a new bike for little S as she still uses her old toddler bike. She grew out of it ages ago…. needs to pass it on to little I.

Hifdh. Alhamdulillah we have hifdh revision session nearly every day. I use the Qur’an tracker charts for both girls. When they feel demotivated, we talk and discuss how Allah elevates their status in the HereAfter with each new surah they learn. Sometimes we read the English/Uzbek translation. Alhamdulillah, it helps.

Arabic. Mainly revising what we have learnt before. We still focus on topic-based vocabulary. Use Arabic HandWriting Book and worksheets for handwriting, Madinah Arabic Book 1 for vocab and grammar.

Islamic Studies. Reading lots of Islamic story books, prophets’ stories, seerah stories and have a follow-up discussion. I try to develop their oral expression; they can answer the questions, explain the Islamic concepts learned, illustrate the Islamic concepts learned with real-life examples from their own daily life and experience. We pray together once a day; usually asr prayer these days. Review how to make wudu, what to say when dua cards, a box of manners cards 2-3 times a week. MashaAllah they always remember their duas when entering/leaving bathroom, entering/leaving the house, before/after a meal, going up/coming down the stairs etc. They often remind us and have taught little I a number of duas. For example, he always says “Allahu Akbar” going up the stairs and “SubhanAllah” coming down the stairs.

Maths. Big S is finishing her Maths workbook. She still struggles with some problem solving and mental maths concepts presented towards the end of MEP Year 1. These are mainly working with calendar, clock/timings, speed and measuring different things etc. Little S is doing MEP Year 1 too and currently finished working on operations up to number 9. She is really good in Maths and I generally do not push her as much as I used to do her elder sister. Sometimes she does a page, sometimes 2 pages and sometimes refuses to do maths. So, we just revise and review old maths concepts like shapes, colours, numbers up to 20, repeating patterns, counting by 2’s.

English. As usual, we all spend a great deal of time reading books. We go to the library every Saturday morning. Children take part in story time followed by an activity. We take out between 20-30 books each week (took out 20 books yesterday). Little S’s reading improved but I can see she is not a bookworm like her sister. She enjoys being read to but doesn’t read more than one book at a time by herself.

Her sister, on the other hand, refuses to do anything until she finishes all 20 books in one go. I had to ask her 10+ times to have her lunch and then keep reminding 20+ times to put all the books away whilst eating. I remember my mum used to get annoyed when one of us kids sat down for dinner with a book in our hands. She would get so angry if we kept reading whilst eating….And I used to think “what is it to you mom, as far as I have my dinner, with or without a book, what difference does it make to you” etc. But, honestly, I find it so annoying as a mother now. Every time I see big S with a book on dinner table, I am like “Go now and do not come back until you put that book away”. I must be ageing….

Chapter Books. Big S enjoyed reading the following chapter books last week.

“Puppy Gets Stuck” by Sue Mongredien

“Little Lost Hedgehog” by Jill Hucklesby

Writing. Following Ch. Mason’s narration method, we do not use any “Learn How to Write” workbooks or programs for composition, spelling and general writing. Alhamdulillah, their writing skill is developing naturally. Their typical daily writing activities include:

  • Writing letters to their friends, to me, to grandma, to grandparents back home
  • Shopping lists
  • Writing captions for the pictures they have drawn by themselves
  • Writing short stories by themselves
  • Rewriting the stories they have read

Little I is always copying his sisters. He tries to write and draw. When it comes to reading, he is just like big S. He can sit down and read books for hours. He is always after me, dad and grandma trying to get one of us sit down and read for him. We were watching a really interesting documentary about African Cats with kids yesterday afternoon. He quickly got bored, even though it was so interesting and made for children by Disney Channel. But, he absolutely loves books and does not seem to get bored with books. He is good at narrating and retelling the events too. He talks so well in full sentences, alhamdulillah. He has learnt some English phrases thanks to my neighbours and often uses them when we have visitors. He likes playing with legos, foam and wooden building blocks and his animal collection.

If anything we have been doing most lately, it is The Play. Like I said, due to nice weather outside, they have been playing so much. Our daily homeschool session does not last more than an hour. I try to vary the subjects and types of activities we do daily. But, I have just realized recently how much a child can learn by playing, by using her own initiative and imagination, by exploring things on her own. I often wonder why I used to worry so much about big S when we first initially started. All those concerns seem to have faded away and I am becoming less and less reluctant to send her to school even when she is older. I pray when the time comes, Allah will guide and help us to make the right decision. But for now, we are all happy with the progress and learning at home.

Positive Islamic Parenting Reminders

Bismillah,

Alhamdulillah, we had our next Islamic Parenting class today attended by 16 mothers. It went really well mashaAllah where everyone shared their tips and experiences on how to help our children with memorizing the Qur’an. If you would like the handouts and the power point presentation from today’s session to be emailed to you please comment on this post with your email address inshaAllah. I will not stop in detail as I have posted previously here and here on hifdh.

We talked a lot about parenting through positive reinforcement today. I had a handout which summarizes ten reminders to be read each morning by parents, especially mothers who are quite busy tending to the needs of a number of children. I don’t remember where I got them originally. But I have got it printed and stuck to my fridge and read from time to time, to remind myself on positive and effective parenting. So, here goes the list.

  1. I am raising my child to be a successful khalifah of Allah, who will help create a truly Islamic World.
  2. Today I will try my best to know and understand all the influences upon my child’s development.
  3. Today I will try my best to help my child understand the power of negative influences to take him/her away from Allah, and the power of positive influences to take him/her to Allah.
  4. Today I will try my best to shield my child from the power of the negative influences.
  5. Today I will try my best to enhance/increase the power of the positive influences on my child to take him/her to Allah.
  6. Today I will try my best to notice some positive things my child does or says, and tell him/her how much those things are appreciated by me and by Allah.
  7. Today I will try my best to say nothing negative to my child. Even if I have to correct my child’s wrong behaviour I will try my best to find some positive way to do so.
  8. Today I will love my child unconditionally, but I will try my best to express that love at times which are most beneficial to my child.
  9. Today I will try my best to be an example of a good and right human being/Muslim for my child.
  10. Today I will pray for Allah’s help that I can be a good parent for my child.

How easy it sounds and how difficult to implement those things in our everyday life. For example, I really struggle to understand what motivates my 4.5 year old daughter to misbehave and I struggle to correct her wrongdoing in positive way.

How about you? Do you find you often discipline your child through negative reinforcement like commenting on their misbehaviour or wrongdoing? Do you resort to force or use physical punishment? Do we as parents put emphasis on achievement and show appreciation of their well behaviour often enough? When we keep commenting on their misbehaviour what becomes of their self-value? Do you worry that “naughty” or “troublemaker” or “loser” might become their self-perception?

 

Winter is back

Bismillah,

We have had really cold weather over the past couple of weeks. Children started playing out in the garden daily for a couple of hours in mid February. But the weather has been so down again after the 8th of March, on which date we had our big uzbek sumalak party in Manchester. It was so boiling hot on that Saturday the 8th of March 2013. We were thinking of doing the BBQ out in the garden the following weekend. But, subhanAllah, it has been snowing on and off since that date. The temperature is usually below zero outside. We have not been able to finish off our planting project in the garden. Today, after 2 days of non-stop snowing it was about knee high. My husband took kids to local library yesterday. They got stuck in snow and had to be rescued (by me). May Allah keep everyone safe amin.

Homeschooling is very much continuing, alhamdulillah.

Big S.

We do English 2-3 times a week. We do Charlotte Mason style dictation for her spelling once a week. Alhamdulillah, her spelling is excellent. I still need to teach her a lot of punctuation marks though. We try to get her talk about the books she reads. However, she is less and less willing to narrate the story. She just tells us what the story is about in 1-2 sentences. I noticed when she reads books in English and asked to narrate in Uzbek, her brain finds it difficult to do language-switch. It is at this point she gets frustrated because she does not know much of vocabulary in Uzbek in order for her to tell the story fluently. She mixes up a lot of English words to narrate the story. So, I have started to focus on her narrative skills in the English language only. And we usually do written narration as she prefers it to write down rather than to do it orally. Alhamdulillah, she loves writing. I printed out a set of reading comprehension cards. Each card states a question such as Who is the main character? What is the main character like? Which season does the story take place? Are there any sad/funny parts? Which part is your favourite? Would you recommend it to a friend and why? So, she chooses a book to read to me. We discuss the book a little. Then I hold one card at a time. She reads the question and writes the answer down. It helps with grammar/spelling/reading comprehension as she is trying to make her own full sentences, learning to use the correct tense and summarizing the story in the right order etc. Finally, she is practising cursive writing with a workbook. She is not too keen at the moment but she does try.

Maths. She is revising the last 20 pages of MEP YEAR 1. I did look into Kumon Math and other Math workbooks but preferred MEP to all of them. Maybe because we have got used to this programme. It is challenging enough for her and it is not straightforward like Kumon Math. For example, in MEP Year 1, she has learned

  • addition and subtraction using numbers 0-20
  • introduction to multiplication/division,
  • the use of calendar (days of the week, months of the year and how they rotate, how to find a certain date and see which day of the week it will be etc)
  • Lots of problem solving
  • The use of money (coins and notes etc)
  • Odd/Even numbers, 1 digit, 2 digit, 3 digit numbers, units etc
  • Mental maths- how to add/subtract 2 digit numbers mentally, counting by 3’s, 4’s, 5s, 6’s etc

Generally speaking, I am very pleased with what the programme offers and inshaAllah intend to continue with it. I do not want to start MEP Year 2 as I thought it could be too challenging for her current level. Like I said, we have resumed our maths classes after a long break and want to revise MEP Year 1 thoroughly inshaAllah.

Science. She is currently on another KS2 Science workbook learning about shadows, reflection and light. I will update in more detail when she finishes her book inshaAllah.

Qur’an hifdh. Alhamdulillah, we have been able to do a lot of muraajah the past 2 weeks. Every day I ask her to recite 4-5 surah off by heart which she does. Then she chooses 1-2 surah to read from Quran for her tajweed. Alhamdulillah, it is going well so far. I pray Allah makes it regular as we seem to be going through the phase where we do Quran regularly and progress a lot. Then once we drop it we just go into looong break after which we struggle to restart our Quran/Tajweed lessons.

Arabic. She is still continuing with her Madinah Arabic Book 1 and Gateway to Arabic Book 2. She is memorizing lots of vocab, practise handwriting and her Arabic reading improved a lot, mashaAllah.

Small S. Alhamdulilah, she has been able to teach herself how to read. She is now reading books aimed at young readers. We do not do anything except reading together with her. She does practise her writing with workbooks. At this stage, I do not want to push her for anything that she does not show interest. So, whenever she wants to practise her handwriting, I will just pass a worksheet with tracing words or a workbook. She seems to be very good at maths. I am surprised at most things she can do as I did not teach her the way I taught her sister. Maybe she has picked up from her big sister when I was not around. She can count 0-20 and then countdown 20-0. She does additions/subtractions with numbers 0-10 and she is so good at it. She does how many more/how many less activities, like how many more 7 than 5. For which she would have to do 7-5=2. So, the answer is 2 more. All these I don’t remember teaching her. I remember teaching this concept of how many more/how many less to big S and I so remember the frustration we both went through. Every time I asked big S how many more 7 than 5, she would simply say 7 more. Maybe she was too young..wallahu a’lam. Anyway, to me it seems little S grabs most maths concept easily. Even if she does not have a bank of concentration and feels very fidgety during lessons. She is learning lots of topic based vocabs in Arabic and currently finishing off Gateway to Arabic Book 1. Alhamdulillah, she started reading in Arabic awhile ago and improving. This is one of the simple exercises I do with her which she likes. I usually write down 8-10 words that she has learned in Arabic. I write these words without short vowels. For example, I write the q-l-m jointly for the word qolam (pen). Then I read out each word at a time and ask her to put the missing vowels (fatha/damma/kasra). She loves this game and it helped her to read more fluently. She is still on surah Tiyn on Quran Hifdh. She has finished memorizing this surah but at the moment I only do revision with her too. They both listen to Qur’an before bed time for about 30-40 mins (they fall asleep listening to Juzz 30 or Juzz 29 playing in digital Qur’an in their bedroom)

Little I. He has been up to so much lately. He is very much into books, just like his sisters. He is always making one of us read to him and loves joining in, copying the actions of the animals on pages (from illustration). He has started talking properly about 2-3 weeks ago. He is talking so fluently now. He can make sentences and can talk in full sentences, just like adults. Generally speaking, he started to walk, eat, hold a pen and write and talk a lot earlier. We all think it is because he has 2 older sisters from whom he can copy. He has learned a lot of nursery rhymes and starts joining in when his sisters sing for him. His favourite is classic Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and Baa Baa Black Sheep. He loves Five Little Monkeys jumping on the bed, too. He is potty trained thanks to grandma. He loves drawing and often asks us to draw him a monkey.  He plays plasticine daily; making different shapes using the cutters. He loves shape sorters. He can name star, circle, triangle and square when we point and ask him “Which shape is this?”. He loves solving the knob wooden puzzles, playing with his legos and making tall towers with stacking cups. He is learning Arabic alphabet with Alif-Baa-Taa wooden blocks. He can count till 10. He has learned names of few colours. Like I said, I have not been able to spend much 1:1 time with him. But, he is always at the background when I am teaching his sisters and copying whatever they do. When we sit down to read Qur’an and do hifdh, he tries to listen and repeat after his sisters. He tries to say surah Ikhlas and Masad off by heart. Of course he just imitates the sounds. His sisters are teaching him everything (sometimes some naughty things too, like how to make bubbles in cup whilst drinking water or screaming or jumping off the sofa)

Anyway, it is late now and I shall be off to bed. Do let me know of my spelling/grammar mistakes as at this point I can not be asked to proofread or edit. Praying for a positive attitude for all parents out there and finish off with this inshaAllah.