Weekend School

Bismillah,

Alhamdulillah, we have started our Raising Sahabas weekend programme in Riyadh. This year we have Year 3/4 group and Year 4/5 group and studying core subjects Maths, English and Science according to British Curriculum. I will be posting weekly updates here inshaAllah as much as I can.

Week one.

English

  • LO- Reading Comprehension in a story poem. Children read the poem “The Owl and the Pussycat” by Edward Lear and answered questions. We did short dictation for spelling and studied Adjectives. Year 4/5 group studied comparatives and the use of adjectives in a descriptive writing. They had worksheets to complete in pairs and when they finished they did peer-checking (marked each other’s work) Each group had a list of nouns. In pairs, they had to list as many adjectives as they can think of for each noun. We also covered how synonym adjectives used together to create more effect (i.e tiny little puppy)

Maths

  • Problem Solving. I found this really good resource online full of problem-solving activities. Each lesson we start with circle time where they have to solve 2-3 problems in groups. So the problems they had to solve last weekend
    1. Count the number of squares in this shape. Most answered 4 but the answer is 5. Second, move two of the sticks to make 6 number of squares. Only two sticks and two moves allowed.

solution

I gave them out cards numbered 1-9 and they had to be divided into three groups in such a way that the total sum adds up to 15 in each group. MashaAllah, they solved this problem in two different ways.

Third task was to guess the number. It is an odd number between 0-50, has 2 digits, the difference between the numbers 1 and the total sum of 2 digits is 5. MashaAllah, one student guessed the number 23 straight away.
Then we did geometry. Year 3/4 group worked on identifying the line of symmetry in different shapes. Year 4/5 group learning about regular and irregular polygons; measuring angles and finding the missing angle in any given shape.

Science

We learnt about circuits and they enjoyed building circuits. They read through the information, followed the instructions and worked on various projects making parallel and series circuits using a bulb, an alarm, a fan etc.

Alhamdulillah, kids had so much fun building circuits. Looking forward to next week!

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Ramadan Battle

Bismillah,

What have we been up to since the 15th April 2014? Well, a lot, really. But, first of all, let me wish all of you a Happy Belated Ramadan Kareem!!! May Allah enable us all to really change and improve ourselves for the better this Ramadan amin.

Home-educating is going well. We do almost nothing structured with regards to academic subject on a day-to-day basis. Both big and little S attend Maths, English and Science classes once a week at Raising Explorers (where I work) and they go to madrassah there Tues-Fri afternoons 4:30-6:30pm. So, what do we do at home?

Gardening

We have done a lot of gardening this Spring/Summer 2014. We have planted strawberry plants early in Spring and they were all growing so well. They all had 5-6 fruits each but the slugs started eating the leaves. My neighbor suggested I put some salt on all plants which had a disastrous ending, the fruits and leaves dried up. They have all grown out by now but  no homegrown strawberries for us this year. InshaAllah, I am hoping the plants would double by next year and we will have some fruits.

We have also planted an apple tree and a pear tree. They both blossomed well but we have got no pears for this year. Alhamdulillah, we have plenty of apples and we can not wait to bake an apple pie with those.

Pear tree

Apple tree

Strawberry plants

Strawberry plants

Trips and Outings

We have been going on a lot more trips lately since the arrival of my parents. We want to show them around as much as possible. We have been to quite a lot of local parks, including:

Roberts park in Saltaire; Roundhay Park in Leeds, Chellow Dene Reservoir, Ogden Waters, and of course our local Lister park. I have made a list of few other free places to go after Ramadan inshaAllah: St. Ives Park in Bingley, Shibden Park in Halifax, Stockeld Park, Cliffe Castle in Keighley, Bolling Hall, Bolton Abbey and Manor House. I am trying to make use of all free museums, galleries and parks as the costs can easily add up when multiplied x8 in the family lol. We may take them all to Yorkshire Wildlife centre for Eid

My mummy at Chellow Dene

Arabic and Qur’an

We have not been doing much Arabic language at home except what she learns at Raising Explorers. We revise the surahs of the Juzz Amma they have memorized and Sumayya reads half a page of Qur’an daily. Safiyya has just started reading too, mashaAllah but no pressure. She reads when she wants to. Having attened Tajweed classes recently, I have just started explaining the Tajweed rules to big S recently. Up until now, she has learnt how to read by listening only and kind of figured out most rules (without knowing the names such as Idghaam, Izhaar, Iqlaab etc). 1-2 daily they pray with me, again no pressure, hence not very regular. As big S turned 7 this year, I should be encouraging her more inshaAllah.

Russian progress

Alhamdulillah, big S  has been going to Russian 3 times a week. She goes to Russian class organized for the children of local Russian families on Monday afternoons. Then WEd/Fri mornings she goes to her tutor’s house for 2 hours. She can now read, write and speak a little bit of Russian. She can talk about most topics including her family, likes/dislikes, animals, fruit/veg, about her house, about her grandparents and weather etc. They do little bit of grammar but mainly conversational Russian as I want her to be able to speak and understand first. She has learnt so much vocab and can use them well. Alhamdulillah. There is also a farm next to her tutor’s house. So, we have been going 1-2 times a week to feed the horses, see llamas, donkeys and a pony.

Kids trying to feed horses

Islamic Studies and Self-Evaluation

All of us have to work on our manners, especially myself as I have to model the exemplary behavior for them. This thought has been troubling me so much lately. My confession yesterday was “I have always known that children learn by example. They are the best imitators, regardless of weather you do a good thing or a bad thing, they will try and copy the adults around them. Seems like I have known it theoretically up until this point. So, I have recently discovered that before fixing everyone else around me, especially my poor kids, I should first fix myself. As an adult and as a mother of 4 home-educated kids I see some major flaws in my own character. I can lecture my children about what is good and right thing to do but the children mirror and project my own faults which is scary. I am almost always battling with my own self and questioning “am I doing the right thing/wrong thing” and worry a lot about my children’s character too. But, like I said, I came to the conclusion that as long as I work hard to try and fix my own problems, inshaAllah Allah will take care of my children and how they are going to turn out as a person. The battle with the self continues….May Allah give all mothers out there an immense amount of patience and make parenting easy for us and give us a good ending. Amin ya Rabb!!!

I don’t know why I feel so burdened, so pressured these days with mothering duties and responsibilities…I have terrible mood swings at times and end up feeling so guilty for having shouted at kids…I am always asking for more patience in my duas as I am quick to criticize my kids. How do you deal with your inner critique that sets up the standards so high for your kids? I am finding it so hard to just let it go. Alhamdulillah, slowly but surely I am working more on myself rather than kids and feel moving in the right direction. I am praying to have a better week ahead inshaAllah: less yelling, less shouting, less correcting, less critique; more encouragement, more peaceful, more connecting and more praise.

General Home-Ed Review

Alhamdulillah, I am happy where we are at. Like I said, at this point in life we are focusing much more on character-building rather than in any form of structured academic lessons. Above all, I would want myself and my children have a good personality. I just want to be good inshaAllah…

Once again Ramadan Mubarak my dear sisters and wishing you all to have the best Ramadan yet!!!

Russian school and British gymnastics

Bismillah,

We have lately adopted more of Unschooling Approach to home-ed. Alhamdulillah we do English 2 times a week, Maths 2 times a week, Qur’an daily, Arabic 3-4 times a week. There is no timing, when and how long the lessons last depends on their mood and aptitude.

Hifdh/Qur’an Reading. Sumayya still reads tons of books a week. I am seriously thinking of cutting down on her reading hours as she is again having meltdowns when it comes to Qur’an time. She has forgotten some of the surahs she has memorized previously. Incident today gave me a final push to reach a deal with her; we have agreed every day after breakfast she goes back to her room to revise 2-3 pages I set as a task and come back down when ready to read to me off by heart. We are also reading 5 ayahs a day from surah Baqara and have read 4 pages of it so far.

Safiyya and Ibrahim do their Hifdh every morning without a problem, mashaAllah. Safiyya can read the surahs she has memorized and still on Nurani Qaida too. Ibrahim has memorized surah Fatiha and the last 3 surahs from the back (Nas, Falaq, Ikhlas). But we have to prompt the beginning of each ayah sometimes. We all use the same method: Listen and repeat.

Arabic. Alhamdulillah, Sumayya can read, write and understand a little bit. She has built on the vocab and some grammar with Gateway to Arabic Book 2. We practise handwriting too, though I decided it is not so necessary at this age. I think the main focus should be understanding from reading, hence building on vocabulary and comprehension skills.

Safiyya can read, tries to copywrite and learns vocab.

Maths. We have not done MEPs in 3 months now. Sumayya attends Maths classes at RE once a week and I do follow up class at home on what has been taught  once a week. Alhamdulillah for this opportunity and a blessing as I feel the burden of teaching Maths has been taken away. But again, I dont think this is enough once she is past 7 and should definitely be doing more at home.

English. The same old way- reading lots of books and follow up discussion with Q&A. We practise story-telling sometimes where I ask them to narrate a story off memory to me. Sumayya still reads a lot. She read The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe in just around 4 hours (though I dont think the content was appropriate for her age as she could not differentiate if it was real life story due to world war 1, which was a fact but then how come wardrobe can be so big to host kingdom? Children at this age do not get fantasy and it is best to delay any such books). Then on the weekend we watched the film, only half of it as it was too long. We are going to watch the next half on Saturday inshaAllah. Meanwhile she is rereading the book. She takes on a lot of writing porjects on herself simply for pleasure: writing letters, writing stories/poems, making posters etc.

Safiyya reads shorter story books but needs encouragement to read. I do guided reading even though she can read on her own. I was wrong to assume that once a child learns how to read, their reading interest will just take off and they will be flying with so many books daily. Safiyya is more interested in helping me around the house mashaAllah. She does so much tidying up, polishing and general cleaning. Everyone is always shouting out her name in our household “Safiyya, get me this. Safiyya, get me that. Safiyya, take this upstairs. Safiyya, take this downstairs”. I find it difficult when she is not around *smile*

Russian School and British Gymnastics. They have been attending gymnastics and Russian school on Mondays. MashAllah, it is the girls only session at gymnastics where they have learned a lot in just 3 weeks. They enjoy it a lot and we sometimes watch Olympics gymnastics videos and attempt to do some basic movements.

Russian school is going great too. Finally, after so many months I have enrolled them and Alhamdulillah, I am so glad I did. Although Safiyya is not much interested, it still benefits her to be in that environment where everyone speaks Russian. Sumayya, on the other hand, has picked up so much. She can read, write and understand a little bit. She has memorized poems in Russian, learnt the colours, numbers, days of the week, months of the year, seasons, fruit and vegetable names in Russian. She can say few odd words in conversational Russian and always eager to finish her homeworks on time.

At times I come so close to giving up the idea of homeschooling simply because of sibling fighting and rivalry in the house. Sumayya is always arguing with Safiyya, Safiyya is always fighting with Ibrahim and Ibrahim is always jealous of baby Saida. At times dealing and judging between them is just too much, especially if they start complaining that “I am not being fair. I am taking so-and-so’s side because I love him/her more”. I am sure this is nothing new to mothers who have multiple children within short age gap. I think of the peaceful days where I can have 5-6 hours all to “myself” without kids. But then comes the painful thought of sending them to school and I start putting the pros and cons of home-ed and public school on two sides of my scales. And then I say “Have some sabr and these days will pass”. I am having more of these thoughts lately and praying Allah will guide me to what is good.

10 Creative Play ideas for kids 0-7

Bismillah,

Are you stuck for ideas to keep your children entertained and occupied on rainy days? Or perhaps you want to spend the school holidays in a more meaningful play which gives you a chance to bond closely with your child? I planned to write this post well before the holidays but as it happens so, it was meant to be published today. With few more days of remaining holidays, try some of these creative play activities with your children for hours of fun and bonding. No planning required and really does not take hours of preparation. You can stretch each one of these for hours if kids are still enjoying or keep as short as 5 minutes. Either way, it is fun, engaging and interactive for both you and your child.

1. Junk Modelling. We have a box where Safiyya collects all the packaging from everything and anything: cereal boxes, milk bottles, onion net bags etc. And although she makes things daily, occasionally we all sit together with our junk box, glue sticks, scissors and cello tape and everyone makes their own stuff. You can  your child in conversation: what are you making, how are you going to make it, why are you making etc? Good for oral development, verbal expression and logical thinking

 

2. Sensory Play session. Ok, this one is a bit messy but nevertheless doable. When we are out and about, my kids always collect things from nature: acorns, leaves, conkers, sticks, stones, marbles, flowers etc. Again, they keep these in their own plastic bags. They know they have to dry off leaves and flowers first before placing them in a plastic bag. That moment when you are so brave to embrace the mess and have some fun with kids, get these bags out, put some water, flour, paint, gluesticks, some Asian stick spices such as cinnamon sticks etc on the table and children will happily take the lead. This is their most favourite activity.

3. Play dough and Plasticine. No need to explain. All three of my children between the ages of 2.5-7 enjoy this for hours. Meanwhile, I can just get on with my own work. This activity requires the least supervision, unless you have really small child who may want to put it into his mouth. But Ibrahim has been playing as long as I remember and not once I caught him with a playdough in his mouth. But then again, his sisters are always there to help and watch him.

4. Display boards. Ask your child/children to make a display board for their own bedroom on a topic chosen by you or by themselves. If you have printed out the pictures and reminder words already, you can provide these and children will cut out, stick to a board and decorate. However, it is quite fun and allows children to use their own initiative even when you have not prepared anything. Just brainstorm the ideas for a theme/topic, agree on one mutually and give them the basic resources, cardboard box, colours, pencils, paint, coloured papers, scissors and pen. Sometimes just an A4 paper and pen would do too. They have to make a display board and hang on bedroom wall. You can change it monthly, bi-monthly etc.

5. Colouring/Painting/Drawing- no child can ever get bored of painting, right? The same in our household. They paint 3-4 times a week while colouring and drawing for hours is a daily thing.

6. Themed stamp sets/ Stencil sets. We have always had different stencil sets on different themes and kids always loved using them. I have recently bought a farm themed stamp set which has been a huge hit. Even I sit down stamping different characters and then colouring them in to make a farmyard or a house etc. I am planning on buying more stamp sets.

7. Constructive play session with wooden blocks/legos/foam blocks/jumbo threads etc. My children’s all time favourite as they never get tired of playing with these. Each time the box is out they invent a new game, alhamdulillah.

8. Story making and storytelling. You can have a set of pictures cut out of catalogs, newspapers and magazines. A child needs to make a sentence holding each picture at a time and the next sentence has to relate to the first. So, in a way, you are inventing a story about a set of random pictures taken from random places. Use their own pictures from when they were little to add a bit more fun. Excellent tool to develop creative writing skills as they will improve their composing and narration.

9. Indoor picnic. You have planned to take the kids out to the park or for a walk later but it keeps raining. Never mind, have an indoor picnic near the fire in your front room. Make it a teddy bear’s picnic just by inviting few of the kids’ favourite toys to an indoor picnic.

10. Role-play involving adults of the household. Sometimes when I am right in the middle of something very very urgent or important, such as baking breads for the coming week etc, Safiyya wants my attention and keeps winging. I have learned to quickly turn it into a role-play session where she becomes a mommy and I am her obedient daughter. I act as a daughter trying to help mom in baking and looking after the house. I try to display all the qualities I would like to see in her. Meanwhile, I am getting on with my work. This is only imaginary and involves a lot of talking on adults’ part. You may not always be up to it, but better than listening a child’s winging. This has worked on numerous occasions but sometimes children just want a cuddle. In that case, just sit down and give them a cuddle.

 

Teaching life skills and the first poem

Bismillah,

Well, first thing is first, big S is writing poems now. I don’t think it is particularly her hobby, interest or passion. And Allah knows best, I might be wrong… One day I just casually mentioned that some of her friends have been writing a poem and read 2 poems written by her friends to her. She wanted to prove that she could do it too and straight after got a pen and paper. And ten minutes later this poem was born. MashaAllah, I was well pleased and chuffed.

Books books are the best
They really put my brain to the test
After a good book I like to rest
Snuggled up in bed with a book on my chest
Then I fall asleep and have a nice dream
When I wake up how real it seems
That’s why I love books so much much
They really have that special touch.

We have been learning some life skills lately, mainly to do with character building. We have watched some of the My Life series on BBC to learn more about the difficulties and challenges disabled children go through in their lives. Last week they watched the film about Helen Keller called the Miracle Worker. Then we did some follow up activities.

First, I blindfolded the girls. They were so giddy and found it very strange. I cut on a plate some fruits and vegetables, namely: lemon, cucumber, pear, apple, tomatoes, banana. I gave them a piece of paper and a pen. I held up one piece of fruit/veg at a time and they had to smell each piece of fruit or veg. Using their sense of smell they both had to try and guess what the fruit/veg was. If they can’t guess it by smelling, then I put the fruit or veg in their mouth. After eating they had to write down the name of that fruit/veg on their piece of paper quietly, without shouting out the answer. That was so much fun for them. Little S has absolutely brilliant sense of smell. She could guess everything straight away by just smelling, even things like cucumber, tomatoes etc that has little smell. Big S could only guess after eating. But they both enjoyed writing the names of fruits/veggies blindfoldedly.  After the activity was over, they had a good laugh looking at their writing. We revised fruit/veg names in Arabic. Then I gave them one question “What is different in the life of a girl who can not see?” to write at least 3 sentence long answer. MashaAllah, they thought and came up with good thought-provoking answers.

Yesterday we watched the film again together since they asked for it. I could not watch it with them last week. I was able to explain how we should not discriminate against children with disabilities; how it is a test from Allah through which Allah will purify them; if those disable people remain patient then Allah will compensate for them in the HereAfter; how an illness can be a blessing sometimes. Again, we discussed Helen’s manners and why she acted in a way she did. Then we did follow up activity again.

First activity we did was on team-building. I folded up the girls’ left hands. They were given paper, straws and cello-tape. Using just their right hands, they were asked to make a bridge with paper, straw and cello-tape in 10 minutes. Big S does not like doing anything under time pressure. It really de-motivates her. Anyway, they took longer but nevertheless were able to work together to cut the tape, one holding the straw, one sticking etc. I kept saying if you argue on what to do next you will take forever. So, you both have to agree on something quickly, take one job each and do it. They both wanted to cut and were unable to cut single-handedly so one had to hold the tape and the other cut etc. Alhamdulillah, it was nice activity to make them work together.

Then I folded their right hands and they had to draw an object I shouted out with a left hand. Another fun activity as they have never used left hand to draw/write/paint etc and were finding it funny. Then they did some painting too.

And finally, they have learnt how to fill out a simple form. Being able to complete forms is one of the essential skills as this is something that they would need to do many times in the future. So, we had old child registration forms for RE which I gave a copy each and asked them to fill out. It was only a page long and very simple form. They read the sections: Child’s details, Parent’s details; Emergency contact details. They completed the forms and loved putting down their signatures at the bottom lol. In the process of writing they memorized my mobile number and email and revised our full home address.

So, we have been focusing on life-skills the past 2 weeks. I can’t help but think of doing less and less structured learning and doing more and more practical and hands-on activities together. Just like any other mom, I want them to enjoy learning. In order to accomplish this goal, I need to provide them with a set of activities that are appealing to their age and interest. Being able to finish 10 pages of worksheets and 1 unit of workbook does mean nothing to me at the moment. The point is that, what impact is that time spent doing worksheets leaving in their brain? What is the real outcome? Have they learnt anything worthwhile that would help them in the long run? That would help them to develop themselves? Watching this TED clip made me think all of this all over again

Hackschooling

Best educational toys for toddlers

Bismillah,

We had visitors over the weekend and a friend offered to take the girls for sleepover. So, I agreed and off they went. However, little I was looking everywhere for his sisters. He kept asking for them and was going nearly mental lol. So,Monday morning, first time in a long long time, I had to sit down and keep him occupied. We have played few of their hands-on toys to revise/learn some numeracy and literacy skills. So, I have decided to write a review for some of the best toys worth investing, in my opinion. I say in my opinion because this is purely based on our own experience. My kids loved these toys, spent hours with them and learnt a lot through playing them. So, here is my list of 6.

1. The Alphabet wooden blocks. Perfect for little hands to grab. You can use these in a number of ways to teach both the Arabic and English alphabet. It also has numbers on the other two sides. We usually make an Alphabet train by putting the blocks in the right Alphabetical order. Or mix up and ask a child to identify a particular letter you have been learning that week. Here is the link to this resource. I have bought ours when big S was born. After nearly 7 years of being used by 3 kids, it still has plenty of life left for baby S to enjoy when she is older inshaAllah

image

2. The shapes wooden blocks. This is especially good for hand-eye coordination, to teach both the shapes and the colours. All my kids loved this. The one we had was from Asda Living store but this is easily available in ELC and ToysRus or online shops. This has 15 shaped wooden blocks, perfect for little toddler hands.

image

3. Foam blocks. These are quite chunky in size but has been such a hit. Excellent to make any construction using varied shaped foam blocks, review shapes/colours whilst building things. Excellent to encourage creativity and hand-eye coordination. I got two large packs in car boot when big S was a baby. All 3 children still play with these daily

image

4. Wooden blocks and pieces for constructing castles, houses, farms and just about anything you can imagine. These we bought recently after all the constructive materials have been such a hit in our household. My children love playing with legos, foam blocks, wooden blocks. We keep all of these in a large plastic box so they are all mixed up. They spend at least 2 hours a day playing with them. We had these wooden blocks with a trolley from ELC, again bought when big S was a baby. Since they play all the blocks really well and they play them a lot, we have decided to buy them a new addition to their constructive box. Like I said, it has been a hit since the pack had unusual items and pieces.

image

This is what their houses look like when nearly finished. But, they keep changing and adding things forever.

5. A pack of animal figurine collection from ELC. We had mini wild animals and farm animals. Ooo, these are their favourite toys. They do a lot of role-play using these. They build a farm and put the farm animals on the farm. Or they build a house for a gazelle and pretend it is hiding from a lion etc. Awesome awesome recourse to encourage imagination, creativity, to teach the names of animals, the food chain (predator, prey) etc etc

6. Knob wooden puzzles. We these ones: Arabic alphabet, English alphabet, Arabic numbers, English numbers, Animals+Shapes. Again, these are good for fine motor-skills as child is required to hold it with 2-3 fingertips and hand-eye coordination. I bought the Arabic alphabet and Arabic number wooden puzzles from Emaan productions. The rest are easily available online or in kiddies’ shops. (Something very similar to these but not exactly the same. Any knob wooden puzzle with less image is fine. I prefer not to have the English transliteration under the Arabic letters btw)

All of these are worthwhile investment as Ibrahim is using them after his two elder sisters and they are perfectly fine for baby S to enjoy next year inshaAllah.

Back to home-school 2013

Bismillah,

This is my very late post on our back-to-school life.

The thing is, I have not been able to do much planning for this academic year. With the birth of a baby in the summer holidays; followed by Ramadan (I was fasting as well as fully breastfeeding the baby); followed by me going back to work; followed by preparations for Hajj (inshaAllah we are off to Hajj in 2 weeks) there just seems to be not enough time to plan and teach everything I want to. So the bad news is that we are not as organized for this year. However, the good news is that I am totally loving it! LOL

We tend to go more towards unschooling approach, taking each day at a time, trying to follow the flow of life, let the kids dictate what they want to do each day and follow their lead. The number of articles I have been reading and the past few months experience teaching and working with parents have somewhat made me more relaxed towards my children’s daily routine. The fact that big S is still not yet fully 7 contributes to this fact of me “chilling out”and “taking things easy”. I keep telling myself that we will start our more regimented/schedule based lessons when they are older. I will be spending more time “teaching on the table” at least after a child turns 7. Of course, I am still teaching all day long on the go, very informal kind of teaching where I have to answer their 101 questions on various topics. Sometimes I just say to them “Go and do your own research on google” lol. And they just love it since they get to use the laptop.

Anyway, we plan and Allah plans and in the end He knows best. Here is what I have planned and what they have been doing this school year so far.

English– Big S is always reading. We are all concerned that she is reading too much and missing on some life-skills she could be learning. Sometimes she spends 6-7 hours in her room reading whereas her little sister spends just as much time helping me around the house by tidying up, polishing, arranging the books neatly on shelves, arranging everything in cupboards around the kitchen, peeling and washing the vegetables I need for today’s cooking etc.

I am trying to get Sumayya to narrate more and Alhamdulillah she is just coming out of her shell. She still does not acquire the skills to narrate the stories she has read in nice chronological order of events, using rich vocabulary to get consistent, smooth flow of events happened in the story. But at this point I am happy with what she can do in narration.

Her composition skills are just coming along and we still practise story-writing. I give a topic to write a story or the first 1-2 sentences and ask her to finish off the story. She writes short stories quite comfortably. I correct her spelling and grammar mistakes. It always strucks me how little grammar or spelling mistakes she makes, even though I have never taught her any grammar and we have never followed any spelling programmes. Alhamdulillah, the magic of reading a lot!

Safiyya can now read short story books. But, the truth is she does not enjoy reading. It is a struggle for her to finish even one book from beginning till end. I remember at her age Sumayya would read as many as 10 such books a day. But then again, Safiyya has excellent narration skills. She mostly analyses the illustrations and comes up with her own story. And she tells me any story so nicely. Her imagination is just awesome and she is way too creative for her age. Alhamdulillah.

We wont do any official writing with her but she is always writing me letters, making cards with messages inside, drawing pictures and writing captions etc. Again, I am happy with her literacy skills at this point.

Ibrahim has been going to Raising Explorers with us since August. Alhamdulillah, he is very social even though he has very limited vocab in English language. He communicates mainly in Uzbek and still learning English. We will start the phonics when I think he is ready. He tries to write when his sisters are writing and has good hand-eye coordination.

Maths- Big S finished MEPs Year 1 and we have mainly been revising the topics. I have to say that this is very challenging Maths programme for both of us. I have tried to teach some of the things inside to other kids at work and most of them were blown away. I have reviewed some other Maths programmes recently, namely Singapore Maths, Kumon Maths and in the end decided to stick to MEPs for a number of reasons (explaining them would require another post). So, inshaAllah we shall proceed onto MEPs YEAR 2 with big S next week.

Little S did MEPs Year 1 up to number rounds up to 10. She is very good in Maths. Indeed kids come with different packages of skills. Sumayya is good at English/literacy and a bit weaker in Maths. Safiyya is weak in English but good at Maths. So, alhamdulillah she will continue with MEPs Year 1 (although she is officially reception kid in the UK for this academic year)

We have just started learning shapes, colours, numbers 0-10 with Ibrahim. We use shape sorters, coloured foam and wooden building blocks, flashcards, coloured stacking cups to learn those. (He is now 2 btw)

Science- nothing formal, no workbooks, no special programmes, except watching and observing things/movements around us and learning about them.

Qur’an– my aim for this Year for big S is start reading the Qur’an cover-to-cover from back to front inshaAllah. We still mainly focus on hifdh and I ask her to read a random page or  a random surah here and there. She can read alhamdulillah. Still using Madinah Arabic Book 1 in Arabic.

Little S is still on hifdh. She has a long way to finish Juzz Amma inshaAllah. She can read a stand alone words from various surahs but can not read on mus’haf as reading is not her thing. Still using Gateway to Arabic Book 1 in Arabic.

Islamic Studies- again very much hands-on approach. We talk, discuss, explain all Islamic concepts, rituals, practices all day long; we try to pray together; we try to read Qur’an daily; we try to say all our daily duas; make dhikr and dua etc. We read books and stories. They both won an Islamic activity book each at Raising Explorers Eid party recently and have been trying to complete them.

Sumayya was awarded as one of the best achieving students in her class. She is half way through this book

Safiyya won this book in the Qur’an competition for her age group

InshaAllah, Sumayya will start attending Maths/English/Science classes at Raising Explorers from next Saturday. She will be attending an hour of each class on Saturdays only, a total of 3 hours, Safiyya is too young to attend those classes yet. We will carry on at home.

My rough scheduling is that I am aiming to have at least 4 hours of Maths a week with each child, 4 hours of Qur’an, 3 hours of English inshaAllah.